August 5, 2009

Kubrick’s monolith on Mars

Posted in Astronomy, Cosmology, Evolution, Mars Mission, Mystery, Nature, Science, Science Fiction, Space, Universe at 10:58 am by deadlikeme

Monolith-2001

Lunar Explorer Italia has recently published a photo of what seems to resemble a monolith on Mars. It was taken by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter last July.

And according to Buzz Aldrin there is also a monolith on Mars’ moon Phobos.

Was there once intelligent life on Mars or are these monoliths just natural rocks and boulders, like the infamous human face photographed by the Viking 1 probe in 1976?

marsface

Read the Dailymail.co.uk article for more information.

January 22, 2008

Bigfoot on Mars?

Posted in Astrophysics, Mars Mission, Mystery, Science, Science Fiction, Space, Universe at 3:35 pm by deadlikeme

marsalien.jpg

An old snapshot taken by Mars Rover Spirit seems to contain a mysterious figure walking downhill. Take a look at the picture and judge for yourself if it’s really an alien or just an odd rock formation.

check the dailymail.co.uk article for more and a higher resolution image of the above.

EDIT: I tracked down the original NASA image, you can watch it here (Resolution: 12756 x 3487, Size: 5.6MB); the “formation” is indeed visible on the lower left side, so at least it’s not a Photoshop fake

December 23, 2007

Tinker Bell in the sky

Posted in Astronomy, Astrophysics, Cosmology, Nature, Science, Universe at 10:48 am by deadlikeme

tinkerbell.jpgA rare case of a triple merger of galaxies bears a resemblance with J.M.Barrie’s Tinker Bell.

Through near-infrared VLT (Very Large Telescope) observations it was possible to identify the triple merger nature of the galaxy known as ESO 593-IG 008 (or IRAS 19115-2124). It was previously merely known as an interacting pair of galaxies at a distance of 650 million light-years.

The object was dubbed “The Bird”, but it also bears a resemblance with the fairy Tinker Bell from James Matthew Barrie’s novel Peter Pan. 

The “wings” itself extend more than 100,000 light years, the size of our own galaxy, the Milky Way.

ESO Press release

December 18, 2007

Galaxy fires at neighboring galaxy

Posted in Astronomy, Astrophysics, Cosmology, Science, Universe at 4:13 pm by deadlikeme

black-hole.jpgA powerful jet from a super massive black hole is blasting a nearby galaxy.

3C321 is a system containing two galaxies in orbit around each other. The larger galaxy has a jet emanating from the vicinity of its black hole and the smaller galaxy has apparently swung into the path of this jet.

Such jets are not news to scientists, “but this is the first time we’ve seen one punch into another galaxy like we’re seeing here,” according to Dan Evans, scientist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

for more info read the NASA article

P.S.  just to clarify: these jets do not emanate from the black hole itself, but from the matter “falling” into it

August 24, 2007

Hole in the Universe

Posted in Astronomy, Astrophysics, Education, Nature, News, Science, Universe at 8:40 am by deadlikeme

hole.jpgAstronomers of the University of Minnesota found a surprisingly big hole in the universe.

Holes or voids in the universe are not really news, but this one dwarfs them all. It measures nearly a billion light-years across (our galaxy, the Milky Way, is about 100,000 light-years in diameter).

Lawrence Rudnick, Shea Brown and Liliya Williams drew their conclusions by studying data from the NVSS (NRAO VLA Sky Survey). The region had previously been dubbed as the “WMAP cold spot”. WMAP is a satellite, launched by NASA in 2001 to measure the Cosmic Microwave Background. The cold spot was discovered in 2004.

Lawrence Rudnick:

Although our surprising results need independent confirmation, the slightly colder temperature of the CMB [cosmic microwave background] in this region appears to be caused by a huge hole devoid of nearly all matter roughly 6 to 10 billion light-years from Earth.

Visit the Physorg.com article for more,

or read Rudnick and Co’s Extragalactic Radio Sources and the WMAP Cold spot paper